Fall Protection Topic TravSources® (USA)

Construction workers working on top of a building with their PPE, and fall projection.

A collection of tools and resources to support your unique business needs.

Employers have the responsibility to protect their workers from fall hazards. Standards and best practices require that when workers are exposed to fall hazards, fall protection must be in place.  Typically, work at heights of 6’ and above involves fall hazards and as a result, requires fall protection.  However, keep in mind that workers have been injured from falls from heights of less than 6’.  It is always important to consider your specific work environment at any height.

Getting Started

Risk Insights and Strategies

Construction worker working on a roof.


Fall Protection Overview

Fall protection encompasses a broad spectrum of techniques, equipment and legislation to help prevent injuries and the loss of lives due to falls. There are a number of important steps that must be included in any good fall protection program. The establishment of a good company policy and the enforcement of that policy are critical to a fall management program’s success.

Back view of construction worker in high elevations with fall protection.


Fall Protection Training

Protection of company assets, including the workforce, is the moral, ethical and fiscally right thing to do for protecting your company’s profit, viability and reputation. In 2013, 699 workers lost their lives from falls and 82% of those fatalities were falls to a lower level. One out of four occurred after a fall from 10 feet or less and one-fifth of the fatal falls were from falls over 30 feet1.

1http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf
Construction worker in red visibility jacket standing on scaffold for a building in high elevation.


Equipment and Systems

Learning about fall hazards in your work areas and how to control them is perhaps the most important part of any fall management program. Employees must be able to recognize fall hazards and know the appropriate actions to take to protect themselves.

Close up of two construction workers wearing fall protection.

Personal Fall Protection

Often workers may be required to work at elevated levels that are not protected by passive protection systems (ie: guardrails) and can’t be engineered out. When working in these areas, workers may have to use personal fall protection equipment and systems. Personal fall protection equipment and systems can include, but not be limited to full body harnesses, connectors, anchorages, horizontal/vertical lifelines, fall restraint, body positioning and rescue.

The information provided in this document is intended for use as a guideline and is not intended as, nor does it constitute, legal or professional advice. Travelers does not warrant that adherence to, or compliance with, any recommendations, best practices, checklists, or guidelines will result in a particular outcome. In no event will Travelers, or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates, be liable in tort or in contract to anyone who has access to or uses this information for any purpose. Travelers does not warrant that the information in this document constitutes a complete and finite list of each and every item or procedure related to the topics or issues referenced herein. Furthermore, federal, state, provincial, municipal or local laws, regulations, standards or codes, as is applicable, may change from time to time and the user should always refer to the most current requirements. This material does not amend, or otherwise affect, the provisions or coverages of any insurance policy or bond issued by Travelers, nor is it a representation that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any such policy or bond. Coverage depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss, all applicable policy or bond provisions, and any applicable law.

The information provided in this document is intended for use as a guideline and is not intended as, nor does it constitute, legal or professional advice. Travelers does not warrant that adherence to, or compliance with, any recommendations, best practices, checklists, or guidelines will result in a particular outcome. In no event will Travelers, or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates, be liable in tort or in contract to anyone who has access to or uses this information for any purpose. Travelers does not warrant that the information in this document constitutes a complete and finite list of each and every item or procedure related to the topics or issues referenced herein. Furthermore, federal, state, provincial, municipal or local laws, regulations, standards or codes, as is applicable, may change from time to time and the user should always refer to the most current requirements. This material does not amend, or otherwise affect, the provisions or coverages of any insurance policy or bond issued by Travelers, nor is it a representation that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any such policy or bond. Coverage depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss, all applicable policy or bond provisions, and any applicable law. (MyT0007)